Game Poster Design

The next important part of this project was producing a promotional poster to advertise our game. As with all other aspects of the design for this project, I wanted a clean, simple design that would clearly show what our game was about.

First of all, I had to get an illustration to form the basis of the poster. The illustrator in my team refused to produce this illustration, despite me asking him to produce it for a period of at least two weeks. Instead,I had to ask our game artist to provide me with an illustration I could use viably for the poster. Luckily, she was more than happy to help right away, and I was finally able to finish making the poster.

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The image above is a cropped version of the image provided by Artemis (our game artist) to be used as the main focus of the poster. It features our anonymous astronaut, the only playable character in the game to date.

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Next, I added a logo to the image to try and make it more poster-like. The orange logo worked better than any of the others, in the opinion of myself and my team members. The landscape version of the poster didn’t work very effectively, in my opinion, so I tried again with a portrait orientation.

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The image above shows the  final detailing for the poster designs. I decided that to give it a bit more realism, adding a company logo (Talentless Games Co., a mock company for our “game development”), a QR Code that when scans leads to a Twitter page I also created for the game, and a PEGI age rating which is present in almost every game available to purchase digitally or physically.

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Here is the final poster design, with all the elements combined. I think the composition and the colours both work incredibly well, and it clearly communicates that we are advertising a new game. Knowing the necessity of producing a high quality poster to showcase our game, I not only took opinions from my team, but also my fellow classmates, and even had a few tell me if I were to produce the posters for sale, they would actually buy them.

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Shirt Designs

As a side note to the main project, I created some t-shirt designs which I had hoped to put into production in time for our CoLAB show on 13-12-16, but due to financial limitations, I couldn’t afford to fund the printing of the shirts. However, I thought it would be worth including some of these designs on my blog, as evidence of branding opportunities I explored during the course of the project.

Above are a few examples, I did use all three colours, plus also the logo in white, and the final logo, as I was going to try and get one of each made for sale at the show.
I particularly like the designs with the logo spread across the chest, with their retro look I think if they were actually produced they could sell rather well. I asked numerous people on my college course – and out of college – and had at least 20 people say if the shirts were at a reasonable enough price they’d consider buying one, which can only be a good thing, right?

Artist Research – Herb Lubalin

You can do a good ad without good typography, but you can’t do a great ad without good typography”

Herb Lubalin was an American graphic designer and typographer. He collaborated with Ralph Ginzburg on three magazines: ErosFact, and Avant Garde, and was responsible for the creative visual beauty of the publications. For the last of these, he designed a typeface, one of my personal favourites, ITC Avant Garde – a font which could be described as a nod to the art-deco style of the 1920s. It was used heavily in the 1980s, 90s and the early years of the 21st century, and is even still used in moderation today.

Lubalin’s interest in typography as a communicative implement manifested at an early age, and he was particularly interested in the differences in the interpretation one could impose by changing from one typeface to another. He was very fascinated by the look and sound of words as he expanded their messages with typographic impact. As such, the vast majority of Lubalin’s work was based heavily on typographic experimentation and manipulation. In my personal opinion, his clever use of type allowed him to communicate incredibly efficiently and effectively.

Graphic Designer – My Role In The Team

For this project, I have been assigned the role of Graphic Designer for my team. I’m fairly pleased with this as Graphic Design is the pathway I wish to go down later in the course. As the graphic designer, I have the job of creating the branding and styling for the game, including a logo and promotional material, as well as a style guide – the set of rules I must follow whilst designing aspects of the branding. As well as this, I will also create social media accounts for the game, a very modern and effective way of promoting new content. During the process of producing all of these things, I will maintain constant communication with my teammates, taking their opinions and ideas into consideration before finalising any work.

 

 

Game Overview

Our game, entitled Space Shoes, will be a 2D platform-based game set in outer space. The game itself is set many hundreds of years in the future, although the exact year hasn’t been specified as of yet.

The main character, an anonymous female astronaut, is travelling from Pluto to Mars, in search of a pair of “space shoes” she left there on her last visit. On her way to Mars, her ship crashes into an Asteroid field, damaging the ship. The aim of the game is to collect pieces of the ship scattered around the Asteroid field, so she can repair it and continue on her journey.

The premise of the game is an uncomplicated one, one which is meant to be as light-hearted as possible, meaning it can be played by people of all ages. When designing the game, we wanted to make it as stripped back and basic as possible, to give it a really retro feel.

Artist Research – Josef Muller-Brockmann

Part of the Swiss International Style, Josef Muller-Brockmann was influenced by the ideas of several art and design movements, including De Stijl, Constructivism, Suprematism and The Bauhaus. Perhaps the most well-known Swiss designer, his most decisive work was done for the Zurich Town Hall, as poster advertisements for its theatre productions.

He is recognised for his simple designs, and his clean use of typography (most notably Akzidenz Grotesk), shapes and colours, which inspire many graphic designers in the 21st century. He developed a grid system for producing his designs, one which is still used in some regards to this day. josef-mueller-brockman-1975The design above is an advertising poster for an exhibition in Germany in 1975, for a Japanese lighting company called ‘Akari’. What strikes me most about this piece is how simple it is. The vibrant, glowing colours draw the eye into the centre of the design, and the dark background makes the design stand out even more. The piece itself is elegant, crisp and formal, with the symmetry and clean typography complimenting one another very well. Muller-Brockmann uses shape and typographic elements to great effect in the vast majority of his pieces, which makes him my go-to designer when considering layouts/spreads.